A man wanted for 1st degree child abuse in New Hampshire was located in Maine.

Who Is the New Hampshire Fugitive?

Nashua, New Hampshire Police have identified the suspect as Jose Gurley, 24, who officials say has ties to both Maine and New Hampshire.

Why Were Police Looking For Him?

Gurley has been at large since January 19th, 2023 when Nashua Police Officers responded to a residence for a report of a medical emergency with a young child. Officials say the victim was a four-year-old boy who sustained apparent serious head and facial injuries. As the investigation into the incident continued, Gurley was identified as the suspect of a First Degree Assault, which is a Class A Felony and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

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Where Was He Arrested?

Nashua Police contacted Maine State Police when they learned that Gurley had fled the state. A vehicle Gurley had been associated with was located by Maine State Police at a home in Cornish and so officials obtained a search warrant. Maine Department of Public Safety spokesperson Shannon Moss says, when they went to serve the warrant, police took Gurley into custody without incident on January 26th, 2024.

He is being held at the York County Jail in Maine, awaiting extradition back to New Hampshire.

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