So... you love to hike in Maine.

I've been fortunate enough to have seen a good chunk of our wonderful country, and I always tell anyone who will listen, that we live in one of the most gorgeous spots anywhere. Sure, maybe we don't have some of the giant mountains that other states have, but who cares?

We have one of the most perfect mountains anywhere, being Mount Katahdin. It's tall enough to feel like you're doing a killer hike but central enough in the state, that it's really never more than three hours from just about any location in the state. It's got views for days, and trails for every level of difficulty.

So... you think you've hiked all of them, eh?

Not so fast there, partner. Maine Forest Rangers just announced on their Facebook page that a brand new 30-mile trail loop is having its grand opening this weekend. It's called the Great Circle Trail. It's on the Bureau of Parks and Lands' Nahmakanta Public Reserved Land, right smack dab in the middle of the Katahdin Region.

This weekend is the first time people from the public will have been allowed on the trail. It will be a guided hike along some shorter sections of the trail, with tons of interesting info and history about that area. Folks will meet up at the new Katahdin View Trailhead on the Penobscot Pond Road, on the Nahmakanta Unit.

Now, you do have to register to be a part of this adventure. You can't just show up and join in. You'll need to get in touch with the Bangor office of the Bureau of Public Lands, at 207-941-4412. Once you're registered, you'll be good to go. It's not every day we get a brand new hiking trail of this scale, so enjoy it if you can. Enjoy it for me too!

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